Breaking News: Justice Alito Is A Shmuck And Corporations Are People But Workers And Women Aren’t

Welcome to the USA, everyone. Today the SCOTUS has decided that companies can deny their employees contraception coverage because women aren’t people, and public unions can’t make nonmembers pay fees because why ever would we need to do that. On the former from  NPR:

The Supreme Court has ruled that Hobby Lobby and other closely held for-profit corporations can opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s provisions for no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans. The companies’ owners had objected on the grounds of religious freedom.

The ruling affirms a Hobby Lobby victory in a lower court and gives new standing to similar claims by other companies.

The justices announced their decision Monday morning. We’ll update this post as more information and analysis about the ruling emerge.

The case, Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby, is perhaps the most important decision of the high court’s term, legal analysts say. Burwell, you’ll recall, is Sylvia Mathews Burwell, who became secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services early this month.

Here’s a quick summary of the issue from NPR’s Nina Totenberg:

“In enacting the ACA, Congress required large employers to provide basic preventive care for employees. That includes all birth control methods approved by the FDA. Under the law, religious non-profits were exempted from this requirement, but for-profit corporations were not.
“The Hobby Lobby corporation, which has 500 stores and 16,000 employees, objects to some forms of birth control on religious grounds. 
“But the government points to a long line of cases holding that for-profit companies may not use religion as a basis for failing to comply with generally applicable laws.”

Hobby Lobby and other companies that don’t want to cover contraception cited the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993, which “provides that the government ‘shall not substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion’ unless that burden is the least restrictive means to further a compelling governmental interest,” says the overview of the case by SCOTUSBlog.

There are also financial considerations in play.

“Hobby Lobby owners contend that the ACA contraception mandate imposes a substantial burden on them because failure to comply results in big fines — $26 million a year for Hobby Lobby if it opts out of providing insurance altogether,” Nina reported in March. “Supporters of the mandate counter that $26 million may be a lot of money, but it is less than the company currently spends on insurance.”

Earlier this month, Julie Rovner ran down some of the specifics about the companies’ resistance.

Hobby Lobby is owned by the Green family, she said, who are evangelical Christians, “and the Hahn family that owns Pennsylvania cabinet-maker Conestoga Wood Specialties are Mennonites.”

While both companies already include many forms of birth control in their health plans, Julie reported, “The owners say they are opposed to some forms of birth control — particularly emergency contraceptives Plan B and Ella, which can be used to prevent pregnancy if taken within 24 hours to as much as five days after unprotected sex — because these contraceptives prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in a woman’s uterus.”

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