Weekly News Round-Up 2/23/15-2/27/15: Intersectionality Failings, That Dress, & A Tale Of Two Llamas

Welcome back to the world following a weekend that put many of us in the District into a time warp where only snow existed. If anyone caught the Oscars it was uneventful award-wise but notable speech-wise, with Patricia Arquette delivering a powerful albeit intersectionality-dense speech on working women (supported by Meryl Streep and JLo), Graham Moore sending a touching tribute to queer people the world over, John Legend and Common killing it in a discussion on race in America, and Sean Penn’s racism and xenophobia being appropriately countered by Alejandro González Iñárritu, who may have found the joke ‘hilarious’ but who had this to say: “I want to dedicate this award for my fellow Mexicans, the ones who live in Mexico. I pray that we can find and build the government that we deserve. And the ones that live in this country, who are part of the latest generation of immigrants in this country, I just pray that they can be treated with the same dignity and respect of the ones who came before and built this incredible immigrant nation. Thank you very much.”  Peace out, #OscarsSoWhite. [Related: Disney star Zendaya was a class-act after racist remarks were made concerning her hair.]

Other serious things happened in the world this week but somehow the news concluded with llamas and deceptive dresses. Mic: This blog thinks the dress is white and gold.

Two men help a woman walk in a cemetery on Feb. 21 before the funeral for victims of a carnival stampede in Port-au-Prince. Haiti's president and prime minister attended a rare official funeral on Saturday for the victims of the stampede that killed 17 people earlier this week, accompanying relatives of the dead and hundreds of other mourners at the open air ceremony on a main city avenue.
Two men help a woman walk in a cemetery on Feb. 21 before the funeral for victims of a carnival stampede in Port-au-Prince. Haiti’s president and prime minister attended a rare official funeral on Saturday for the victims of the stampede that killed 17 people earlier this week, accompanying relatives of the dead and hundreds of other mourners at the open air ceremony on a main city avenue.
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays at the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray in Jerusalem's old city, on Feb. 20. A heavy winter storm descended on parts of the Middle East on Friday, with snow forcing the closure of all roads leading in and out of Jerusalem and sprinkling Israel's desert with a rare layer of white.
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays at the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray in Jerusalem’s old city, on Feb. 20. A heavy winter storm descended on parts of the Middle East on Friday, with snow forcing the closure of all roads leading in and out of Jerusalem and sprinkling Israel’s desert with a rare layer of white.
A former circus lion named "King" lays sedated as a veterinarian performs dental surgery, inside a temporary refuge for the lion on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Feb. 20. Vets from the Animal Defenders International (ADI) are operating on lions and monkeys rescued from traveling circuses in Peru and Bolivia. According to the vets, King was removed from a circus in Nov. 2014 and is unable to chew his food properly because most of his teeth had been pulled out, or partially pulled out by his circus owners. It is illegal to use wild animals in circuses in Peru.
A former circus lion named “King” lays sedated as a veterinarian performs dental surgery, inside a temporary refuge for the lion on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Feb. 20. Vets from the Animal Defenders International (ADI) are operating on lions and monkeys rescued from traveling circuses in Peru and Bolivia. According to the vets, King was removed from a circus in Nov. 2014 and is unable to chew his food properly because most of his teeth had been pulled out, or partially pulled out by his circus owners. It is illegal to use wild animals in circuses in Peru.

An [undocumented]l immigrant from Ethiopia covers his face as he waits with others for a boat to cross into Yemen outside the town of Obock, north Djibouti on Feb. 22. The area, described by UNHCR as one of the most inhospitable areas in the world, is on a transit route for thousands of immigrants every year from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia travelling via Yemen to Saudi Arabia in hope of work.
An [undocumented]l immigrant from Ethiopia covers his face as he waits with others for a boat to cross into Yemen outside the town of Obock, north Djibouti on Feb. 22. The area, described by UNHCR as one of the most inhospitable areas in the world, is on a transit route for thousands of immigrants every year from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia travelling via Yemen to Saudi Arabia in hope of work.
images / nbcnews

 

Assorted Stand-Outs:

Continue reading “Weekly News Round-Up 2/23/15-2/27/15: Intersectionality Failings, That Dress, & A Tale Of Two Llamas”

Weekly News Round-Up 2/16/14-2/20/14: Year Of The Ram

Residents of the District, we are being mocked by our peers in Boston. That having been said, it’s been a cold and snowy week — and this weekend looks cold too. Stay bundled up. (DC-related: 10 tv shows about us, ranked. This blog debates the presence of Homeland, however.) This week has a wave of technology news (iCars, anyone?), a combination of ISIS-Nutella-Kittens (don’t ask), advice from the dying, ongoing atrocities from militants in MENA and Sub-Saharan Africa, fights over biryani, solidarity between Jews and Muslims, and a weird cloud hanging over a portion of Mars. Repeat: stay bundled up this weekend. (Brightest news of the week: Coffee may be healthy. You heard it here probably not first but definitely most joyfully.) Also a happy Chinese New Year to all celebrating! Year of the Ram/Goat/Sheep, i.e. this blog’s preferred year.

People rush to plant the first joss stick of the Lunar New Year at the stroke of midnight at the Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho temple in Singapore on Feb. 19, 2015. Each year, at the stroke of midnight, hundreds of people vie to be the first to place joss sticks in an urn at the temple to mark an auspicious start to their year. The Chinese Lunar New Year on February 19 welcomed the Year of the Sheep (also known as the Year of the Goat or Ram).
People rush to plant the first joss stick of the Lunar New Year at the stroke of midnight at the Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho temple in Singapore on Feb. 19, 2015. Each year, at the stroke of midnight, hundreds of people vie to be the first to place joss sticks in an urn at the temple to mark an auspicious start to their year. The Chinese Lunar New Year on February 19 welcomed the Year of the Sheep (also known as the Year of the Goat or Ram).
An injured Myanmar Red Cross volunteer lies on ground after vehicles of a rescue convoy were attacked by Kokang rebels near the self-administered Kokang capital Laukkai, northern Shan State, Myanmar, on Feb. 17.  Myanmar President Thein Sein declared a state of emergency and imposed martial law in a region near the Chinese border after more than 70 people were killed in fighting between the Myanmar army and a rebel group.
An injured Myanmar Red Cross volunteer lies on ground after vehicles of a rescue convoy were attacked by Kokang rebels near the self-administered Kokang capital Laukkai, northern Shan State, Myanmar, on Feb. 17.
Myanmar President Thein Sein declared a state of emergency and imposed martial law in a region near the Chinese border after more than 70 people were killed in fighting between the Myanmar army and a rebel group.
Bulgarian Muslims Azim Liumankov and his bride Fikrie Bindzheva pose in front of their house during their wedding ceremony in the village of Ribnovo, in the Rhodope Mountains, Bulgaria on Feb. 15. The remote mountain village of Ribnovo in southwest Bulgaria has kept its traditional winter marriage ceremony alive despite decades of Communist persecution, followed by poverty that forced many men to seek work abroad.  The wedding ritual was resurrected with vigour among the Pomaks - Slavs who converted to Islam under Ottoman rule. The highlight of the ceremony is the painting of the bride's face, where in a private rite open only to female in-laws, her face is covered in thick, chalky white paint and decorated with colourful sequins.
Bulgarian Muslims Azim Liumankov and his bride Fikrie Bindzheva pose in front of their house during their wedding ceremony in the village of Ribnovo, in the Rhodope Mountains, Bulgaria on Feb. 15. The remote mountain village of Ribnovo in southwest Bulgaria has kept its traditional winter marriage ceremony alive despite decades of Communist persecution, followed by poverty that forced many men to seek work abroad.
The wedding ritual was resurrected with vigour among the Pomaks – Slavs who converted to Islam under Ottoman rule. The highlight of the ceremony is the painting of the bride’s face, where in a private rite open only to female in-laws, her face is covered in thick, chalky white paint and decorated with colourful sequins.
A slum that hosts Afghan refugees and internally displaced Pakistanis from tribal areas is visible through the windshield and mirrors of a rickshaw on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, on Feb. 15.
A slum that hosts Afghan refugees and internally displaced Pakistanis from tribal areas is visible through the windshield and mirrors of a rickshaw on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, on Feb. 15.
Women cook in the local Palace of Culture which is used as a bomb shelter in Mironovka village, in eastern Ukraine, on Feb. 17.
Women cook in the local Palace of Culture which is used as a bomb shelter in Mironovka village, in eastern Ukraine, on Feb. 17.
Dozens of pilot whales lie beached at Farewell Spit on the northern tip of New Zealand's South Island, on Feb. 13. About 140 pilot whales that stranded themselves on a remote stretch of New Zealand beach died, but conservation workers and volunteers helped refloat the remaining 60 or so with hopes they will survive.
Dozens of pilot whales lie beached at Farewell Spit on the northern tip of New Zealand’s South Island, on Feb. 13. About 140 pilot whales that stranded themselves on a remote stretch of New Zealand beach died, but conservation workers and volunteers helped refloat the remaining 60 or so with hopes they will survive.
A Kurdish female fighter of the People's Protection Units looks on at a training camp in al-Qahtaniyah, known to Kurds as al-Darbassiyah, near the Syrian-Turkish border on Feb. 13.
A Kurdish female fighter of the People’s Protection Units looks on at a training camp in al-Qahtaniyah, known to Kurds as al-Darbassiyah, near the Syrian-Turkish border on Feb. 13.

images / nbcnews

 

Assorted Stand-Outs:

Continue reading “Weekly News Round-Up 2/16/14-2/20/14: Year Of The Ram”

Weekly News Round-Up 2/9/15-2/13/15: An Equal And Opposite Reaction

This blog’s thoughts on last Sunday’s Grammy awards range, but a heartfelt congratulations to the talented Sam Smith!  This week brings us a seeming ceasefire between the Ukraine and pro-Russian separatists, the tragic shooting of three young American Muslims, the departure of Jon Stewart from The Daily Show, a full-fledged temper tantrum from a handful of judges in Alabama, and the fact that Ruth Bader Ginsberg apparently likes her wine. Happy weekend to all, stay warm DC residents, it’s going to be a cold one.

Pakistani Christian bride Dunya Yacob, 24, is carried by her cousin to her groom's makeshift home to attend her wedding ceremony at a slum home to Christian families on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Feb. 7, 2015.  “Since I was a little girl, I dreamed of the day I would get married and put on a nice dress and have a nice party with a lot of people,” the 24 year old said. “But today, my dream didn’t turn the way I imagined it, but there is nothing I can do about it. This is how our lives look like today and we have to adapt.”
Pakistani Christian bride Dunya Yacob, 24, is carried by her cousin to her groom’s makeshift home to attend her wedding ceremony at a slum home to Christian families on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Feb. 7, 2015.
“Since I was a little girl, I dreamed of the day I would get married and put on a nice dress and have a nice party with a lot of people,” the 24 year old said. “But today, my dream didn’t turn the way I imagined it, but there is nothing I can do about it. This is how our lives look like today and we have to adapt.”
Robert Povilat, left, and Milton Persinger, comfort each other after hearing that for a second day, the Mobile County Probate office won't issue marriage licenses in Mobile, Ala. on Feb. 10.  A federal judge on Thursday ordered a probate judge in Alabama's second-largest county to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. The ruling is expected to force other holdout probate judges in the state to give marriage licenses to lesbians and gays.
Robert Povilat, left, and Milton Persinger, comfort each other after hearing that for a second day, the Mobile County Probate office won’t issue marriage licenses in Mobile, Ala. on Feb. 10.
A federal judge on Thursday ordered a probate judge in Alabama’s second-largest county to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. The ruling is expected to force other holdout probate judges in the state to give marriage licenses to lesbians and gays.
A blind person feels with her hands a copy of El Greco's 'The Gentleman with his Hand on his Chest' at The Prado Museum on Feb. 10 in Madrid, Spain. 'Hoy Toca el Prado' (Touch The Prado) allows blind or vision-impaired visitors to explore with their hands the copies of six masterworks. The copies were created using a technique called 'Didu' which provides texture and volume to the paintings.
A blind person feels with her hands a copy of El Greco’s ‘The Gentleman with his Hand on his Chest’ at The Prado Museum on Feb. 10 in Madrid, Spain. ‘Hoy Toca el Prado’ (Touch The Prado) allows blind or vision-impaired visitors to explore with their hands the copies of six masterworks. The copies were created using a technique called ‘Didu’ which provides texture and volume to the paintings.
Fisherman Alexander Romantsov looks out of the window of his plywood lodge, placed on the frozen surface of the Yenisei River over an ice hole for fishing, near the village of Anash, in Russia's Krasnoyarsk region on Feb. 7. Some fishermen of the region equip their tiny lodges with miniature coal and firewood-burning ovens and use car batteries to supply electricity, allowing them to fish day and night despite severe temperatures.
Fisherman Alexander Romantsov looks out of the window of his plywood lodge, placed on the frozen surface of the Yenisei River over an ice hole for fishing, near the village of Anash, in Russia’s Krasnoyarsk region on Feb. 7. Some fishermen of the region equip their tiny lodges with miniature coal and firewood-burning ovens and use car batteries to supply electricity, allowing them to fish day and night despite severe temperatures.
Displaced women who fled with their families from the Pakistani tribal area of Khyber due to ongoing operations against militants, wait to receive relief goods at a distribution point in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Feb.10. The Pakistan Red Crescent Society in collaboration with the German Red Cross distributed winterized packages to 480 displaced families.
Displaced women who fled with their families from the Pakistani tribal area of Khyber due to ongoing operations against militants, wait to receive relief goods at a distribution point in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Feb.10. The Pakistan Red Crescent Society in collaboration with the German Red Cross distributed winterized packages to 480 displaced families.
Refugee children play in the snow in the suburbs of Ankara, Turkey on Feb. 11. The kids fled Syria with their families because of attacks from ISIS.
Refugee children play in the snow in the suburbs of Ankara, Turkey on Feb. 11. The kids fled Syria with their families because of attacks from ISIS.

images / nbcnews

Assorted Stand-Outs:

  • HSBC reportedly helped conceal $100 billion in Swiss bank accounts. Oof.
  • Cricket World Cup approacheth.
  • Meet the women behind #blacklivesmatter.
  • Mic has a new section: Connections.
  • Three Muslims were killed in North Carolina following what appears to be a dispute over parking, though it also clearly appears to be a hate crime. The hashtag #muslimlivesmatter has been trending following a lack of response from mainstream media to their murders. | American Muslims react.
  • In a blow to liberal millennials everywhere, their chief source of news Jon Stewart is leaving The Daily Show. This blog admires Stewart and wishes him well.
  • Satire, free speech, and Egypt — there’s an Indiegogo campaign going on right now to provide one Egyptian satirist with a podium.
  • Analyzing the federal government’s use of the Cloud.
  • American hostage Kayla Mueller has been confirmed killed by Daesh/ISIS. Rest in peace.
  • A decade after humanitarian reforms, how have IDPs (Internally Displaced Persons) fared?
  • A WaPo article from last year has been making the rounds again, drawing attention to the double-standards applied to Muslims despite frequent instances of Christian brutality in the name of religion.
  • Opinions: The World War Inside Islam.
  • Same-sex marriage may be about to have its day.
  • Veteran 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon was killed in a car crash in NYC this week. He was a phenomenal journalist and will be missed. Also tragic: the death of New York Times critic David Carr. Sad week for journalism.
  • How America will look in 2050.
  • Fresh Off The Boat is changing a lot about Asian-Americans on tv.

Continue reading “Weekly News Round-Up 2/9/15-2/13/15: An Equal And Opposite Reaction”

Weekly News Round-Up 2/2/15-1/6/15: Hellfire

Congratulations to the Patriots, who won the Super Bowel (Superbowl Superb Owl?)  this week…though Neil deGrasse Tyson’s opinion is all this blog cares about. (That and Missy Elliott.) Apart from that it’s been a somber week — a Jordanian pilot was burned alive in a cage in a move overwhelmingly condemned by people all over the world and one which has pushed his country to take on Daesh/ISIS with a fury. Greece and Germany are going head-to-head over debt while Germany and France multitask attempting to convince Russia and the Ukraine to simmer down. Reclusive author Harper Lee will publish a sequel-come-prequel to To Kill A Mockingbird, a bunch of parents in California won’t vaccinate their children, Australia’s prime minister may be on the way out, and Argentina’s president is struggling with both a case of casual racism and a case of casual murder accusations. Meanwhile TransAsia experienced another tragic plane loss and NYC saw a metro crash in what has to be a terrible week for transportation news.

A flock of starlings is seen as they perform their traditional flight before going to sleep as the sun sets near Rahat, in the northern Israeli Negev desert, on Feb. 2.
A flock of starlings is seen as they perform their traditional flight before going to sleep as the sun sets near Rahat, in the northern Israeli Negev desert, on Feb. 2.

And it’s only February (though DC also has had a remarkably warm winter in light of its northern neighbors being buried under snow).

Musa, a 25-year-old Kurdish marksman, stands atop a building as he looks at the destroyed Syrian town of Kobani on Jan. 30, 2015. Kurdish forces recaptured the town on the Turkish frontier on January 26, in a symbolic blow to the ISIS militants who have seized large swathes of territory in their onslaught across Syria and Iraq.
Musa, a 25-year-old Kurdish marksman, stands atop a building as he looks at the destroyed Syrian town of Kobani on Jan. 30, 2015. Kurdish forces recaptured the town on the Turkish frontier on January 26, in a symbolic blow to the ISIS militants who have seized large swathes of territory in their onslaught across Syria and Iraq.
TransAsia Flight GE235 clips an overpass and hits a taxi before crashing into a river shortly after taking off from a downtown Taipei airport on Feb. 4. The plane had 58 passengers and crew on board.
TransAsia Flight GE235 clips an overpass and hits a taxi before crashing into a river shortly after taking off from a downtown Taipei airport on Feb. 4. The plane had 58 passengers and crew on board.
A man dressed in Red Army World War II uniform walks toward the monument to Motherland during ceremonies marking the 72nd anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad in the southern Russian city of Volgograd, on Feb. 2. The city, which was known as Stalingrad during World War II, suffered six months of intensive fighting that ended with the Red Army's defeat of the Nazis, which marked a decisive turn in World War II.
A man dressed in Red Army World War II uniform walks toward the monument to Motherland during ceremonies marking the 72nd anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad in the southern Russian city of Volgograd, on Feb. 2. The city, which was known as Stalingrad during World War II, suffered six months of intensive fighting that ended with the Red Army’s defeat of the Nazis, which marked a decisive turn in World War II.

 

 

Assorted Stand-Outs:

Continue reading “Weekly News Round-Up 2/2/15-1/6/15: Hellfire”