Weekly News Round-Up 2/23/15-2/27/15: Intersectionality Failings, That Dress, & A Tale Of Two Llamas

Welcome back to the world following a weekend that put many of us in the District into a time warp where only snow existed. If anyone caught the Oscars it was uneventful award-wise but notable speech-wise, with Patricia Arquette delivering a powerful albeit intersectionality-dense speech on working women (supported by Meryl Streep and JLo), Graham Moore sending a touching tribute to queer people the world over, John Legend and Common killing it in a discussion on race in America, and Sean Penn’s racism and xenophobia being appropriately countered by Alejandro González Iñárritu, who may have found the joke ‘hilarious’ but who had this to say: “I want to dedicate this award for my fellow Mexicans, the ones who live in Mexico. I pray that we can find and build the government that we deserve. And the ones that live in this country, who are part of the latest generation of immigrants in this country, I just pray that they can be treated with the same dignity and respect of the ones who came before and built this incredible immigrant nation. Thank you very much.”  Peace out, #OscarsSoWhite. [Related: Disney star Zendaya was a class-act after racist remarks were made concerning her hair.]

Other serious things happened in the world this week but somehow the news concluded with llamas and deceptive dresses. Mic: This blog thinks the dress is white and gold.

Two men help a woman walk in a cemetery on Feb. 21 before the funeral for victims of a carnival stampede in Port-au-Prince. Haiti's president and prime minister attended a rare official funeral on Saturday for the victims of the stampede that killed 17 people earlier this week, accompanying relatives of the dead and hundreds of other mourners at the open air ceremony on a main city avenue.
Two men help a woman walk in a cemetery on Feb. 21 before the funeral for victims of a carnival stampede in Port-au-Prince. Haiti’s president and prime minister attended a rare official funeral on Saturday for the victims of the stampede that killed 17 people earlier this week, accompanying relatives of the dead and hundreds of other mourners at the open air ceremony on a main city avenue.
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays at the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray in Jerusalem's old city, on Feb. 20. A heavy winter storm descended on parts of the Middle East on Friday, with snow forcing the closure of all roads leading in and out of Jerusalem and sprinkling Israel's desert with a rare layer of white.
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays at the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray in Jerusalem’s old city, on Feb. 20. A heavy winter storm descended on parts of the Middle East on Friday, with snow forcing the closure of all roads leading in and out of Jerusalem and sprinkling Israel’s desert with a rare layer of white.
A former circus lion named "King" lays sedated as a veterinarian performs dental surgery, inside a temporary refuge for the lion on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Feb. 20. Vets from the Animal Defenders International (ADI) are operating on lions and monkeys rescued from traveling circuses in Peru and Bolivia. According to the vets, King was removed from a circus in Nov. 2014 and is unable to chew his food properly because most of his teeth had been pulled out, or partially pulled out by his circus owners. It is illegal to use wild animals in circuses in Peru.
A former circus lion named “King” lays sedated as a veterinarian performs dental surgery, inside a temporary refuge for the lion on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Feb. 20. Vets from the Animal Defenders International (ADI) are operating on lions and monkeys rescued from traveling circuses in Peru and Bolivia. According to the vets, King was removed from a circus in Nov. 2014 and is unable to chew his food properly because most of his teeth had been pulled out, or partially pulled out by his circus owners. It is illegal to use wild animals in circuses in Peru.

An [undocumented]l immigrant from Ethiopia covers his face as he waits with others for a boat to cross into Yemen outside the town of Obock, north Djibouti on Feb. 22. The area, described by UNHCR as one of the most inhospitable areas in the world, is on a transit route for thousands of immigrants every year from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia travelling via Yemen to Saudi Arabia in hope of work.
An [undocumented]l immigrant from Ethiopia covers his face as he waits with others for a boat to cross into Yemen outside the town of Obock, north Djibouti on Feb. 22. The area, described by UNHCR as one of the most inhospitable areas in the world, is on a transit route for thousands of immigrants every year from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia travelling via Yemen to Saudi Arabia in hope of work.
images / nbcnews

 

Assorted Stand-Outs:

South Asia:

Southeast & East Asia:

Europe & Eurasia:

  • The Ukraine began the week with a spurt of violence, even as a seeming ceasefire remained in place.
  • In Photos: The destruction of the Donetsk airport.
  • Northern Siberia is warming and the results are terrifying and fascinating.
  • Turkey has both an image issue and a border issue, with Daesh/ISIS controlling a good portion of its border with Syria and mounting accusations that Ankara is serving a role in servicing militants with weaponry.  (The Washington Post has a fascinating look at the different faces of Turkish Islamic nationalism.) Meanwhile, Turkey, already earning some alarm from women, journalists, and minorities, is now increasingly jailing its outspoken youth. A former Miss Turkey may also be facing jail time — for an Instagram post appearing to mock Turkish leader Erdogan.
  • With the help of Kurdish fighters, Turkey was able to evacuate its guards from the Tomb of Suleiman Shah in Syria on Sunday.
  • Can the PKK overcome its image as a terrorist organization? Many are wondering.
  • Inspired by The Imitation Game, a new petition is calling for some 49,000 British men to be pardoned for the crime of homosexuality.
  • Three British teenagers who appear to have left home to join militants in Syria as “jihadi brides” are drawing increasing scrutiny and concern. In a related measure, France seized the passports of six citizens it believed to be headed to Syria.
  • The the Welfare State to the Caliphate: Foreign Policy has an article up on how one Swedish suburb has become a breeding ground for jihadists.
  • Meanwhile the identity of a British ISIS/Daesh member who has risen to fame due to his starring role in various beheadings has been revealed.
  • In an effort to stem the growth of radicalism in Austria, the government has introduced new legislation to implement an Austrian-style Islam that will for the first time provide many previously-demanded rights to the country’s large Muslim population; still, some see it as Islamophobia at its finest.
  • France is holding three Al Jazeera journalists for their role in flying a drone around Paris.
  • Greece and Europe have agreed to a financial compromise, avoiding catastrophe. Still, there are concessions on both sides. Greece initially appears to have conceded the most but others say that in showing muscle to Germany and flaunting the failure of austerity the bankrupt nation has done what none have dared to do and set a new precedent. (Krugman: Greece’s excess burden.)
  • Opinion: Are the Germans going to crash the world?
  • A German man who posed as Hitler has resumed his position as the head of anti-immigrant group PEGIDA. In related news and in a move that many find alarming, Hitler’s autobiography Mein Kampf is set to be published in the country for the first time in decades.

Middle East & North Africa:

Sub-Saharan Africa:

  • Nigeria’s democracy is struggling, both when it comes to fighting terrorism and when it comes to holding fair elections.
  • Violence in the country meanwhile continues to escalate: Boko Haram is increasingly using young people (many of them girls) and women to carry out suicide bombings. A brighter spot in the week was the government’s reclaiming of Baga, under Boko Haram’s control since January.
  • Chad’s army has joined the fray and is hitting the militant group with everything it has.
  • A Somalian terror group, Al Shabab, has threatened various malls and similar spaces in the US, Canada, and the UK. The group also reportedly launched fire mortars at the country’s presidential palace.
  • A tireless Ebola worker caring for orphaned children in Sierra Leone has been diagnosed with the disease and is in treatment. In his absence, the orphanage he worked with has been quarantined.
  • Gunmen reportedly seized over eighty boys from a displaced persons camp in South Sudan early in the week, according to reports.
  • American terrorism warnings may ironically be fueling coastal Kenyan terrorism.
  • South Africa is training elephants to sniff out bombs and hunt poachers.

Americas:

Oceania:

  • Before causing the deaths of two people at a Sydney cafe, a mentally troubled man in Australia reportedly placed 18 calls to the police indicating that a siege was imminent.
  • Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has called for stronger charges against citizens accused of aiding and abetting terrorism, including but not limited to revoking their citizenship.
  • New Zealand will send a small number of troops to Iraq to train forces.

Weekly Wow: 19 manatees are rescued from a drain pipe in Florida. | Gerbils may have caused the Black Plague. | Maps that don’t belong. | Banksy in Gaza.

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