Weekly News Round-Up 3/2/15-3/6/15: Emails, Errors, & Social Justice Failures

Welcome back from your snow day, DC residents. This week is a bad one for Hillary Clinton, human rights advocates, anyone who cares about historic landmarks, basically every minority everywhere, and potentially advocates for same-sex marriage and health care. Happy Friday! (Bright spot: Here are Muslim students in Karachi forming a ring to allow minority Hindus to celebrate Holi in peace.)

A Ukrainian coal miner waits for a bus after exiting the underground of the Zasyadko mine, where he helped search for bodies of colleagues and clear up debris following an explosion, in Donetsk, Ukraine, on March 4, 2015. The explosion ripped through a coal mine before dawn Wednesday in war-torn eastern Ukraine, killing 33 miners.
A Ukrainian coal miner waits for a bus after exiting the underground of the Zasyadko mine, where he helped search for bodies of colleagues and clear up debris following an explosion, in Donetsk, Ukraine, on March 4, 2015. The explosion ripped through a coal mine before dawn Wednesday in war-torn eastern Ukraine, killing 33 miners.
A Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) officer stands near a burning pile of 15 tonnes of elephant ivory seized in Kenya at Nairobi National Park on March 3, the largest amount of contraband ivory burned in Africa to date. The pile was offically burned by Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta to mark World Wildlife Day and African Environment day. An average of 30,000 elephants are poached every year in Africa.
A Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) officer stands near a burning pile of 15 tonnes of elephant ivory seized in Kenya at Nairobi National Park on March 3, the largest amount of contraband ivory burned in Africa to date. The pile was offically burned by Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta to mark World Wildlife Day and African Environment day. An average of 30,000 elephants are poached every year in Africa.
A house is covered with snow from an avalanche in the Paryan district of Panjshir province, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, on Feb. 27. The death toll from severe weather that caused avalanches and flooding across much of Afghanistan has jumped to more than 200 people, and the number is expected to climb with cold weather and difficult conditions hampering rescue efforts, relief workers and U.N. officials said Friday.
A house is covered with snow from an avalanche in the Paryan district of Panjshir province, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, on Feb. 27. The death toll from severe weather that caused avalanches and flooding across much of Afghanistan has jumped to more than 200 people, and the number is expected to climb with cold weather and difficult conditions hampering rescue efforts, relief workers and U.N. officials said Friday.
Cats crowd the harbor on Aoshima Island in the Ehime prefecture in southern Japan on Feb. 25. An army of cats rules the remote island in southern Japan, curling up in abandoned houses or strutting about in a fishing village that is overrun with felines outnumbering humans six to one. Originally introduced to the mile-long island of Aoshima to deal with mice that plagued fishermen's boats, the cats stayed on - and multiplied.
Cats crowd the harbor on Aoshima Island in the Ehime prefecture in southern Japan on Feb. 25. An army of cats rules the remote island in southern Japan, curling up in abandoned houses or strutting about in a fishing village that is overrun with felines outnumbering humans six to one. Originally introduced to the mile-long island of Aoshima to deal with mice that plagued fishermen’s boats, the cats stayed on – and multiplied.
A woman with colored powder on her face joins celebrations of the Holi festival in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines, on March 1. The event is led by Indian nationals as they mark Holi, a Hindu spring festival also known as festival of colors.
A woman with colored powder on her face joins celebrations of the Holi festival in suburban Pasay, south of Manila, Philippines, on March 1. The event is led by Indian nationals as they mark Holi, a Hindu spring festival also known as festival of colors.
U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, center, gets into a car to leave for a hospital in Seoul, South Korea, on March 5 after being attacked by a man. Lippert was slashed on the face and wrist by a man wielding a blade and screaming that the rival Koreas should be unified, South Korean police said Thursday.
U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, center, gets into a car to leave for a hospital in Seoul, South Korea, on March 5 after being attacked by a man. Lippert was slashed on the face and wrist by a man wielding a blade and screaming that the rival Koreas should be unified, South Korean police said Thursday.
Russian police investigate the the body of Boris Nemtsov, a former Russian deputy prime minister and opposition leader at Red Square with St. Basil Cathedral in the background in Moscow, Russia, on Feb. 28. Russia's Interior Ministry says Boris Nemtsov, a leading opposition figure and former deputy prime minister, was shot and killed near the Kremlin early Saturday. His death came just a day before a major opposition rally in Moscow.
Russian police investigate the the body of Boris Nemtsov, a former Russian deputy prime minister and opposition leader at Red Square with St. Basil Cathedral in the background in Moscow, Russia, on Feb. 28. Russia’s Interior Ministry says Boris Nemtsov, a leading opposition figure and former deputy prime minister, was shot and killed near the Kremlin early Saturday. His death came just a day before a major opposition rally in Moscow.

images / nbcnews

Assorted Stand-Outs:

South Asia:

Southeast & East Asia:

Europe & Eurasia:

Middle East & North Africa:

  • Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu was in DC this week to deliver a controversial speech to Congress. (More on Ron Dermer, one of the architects behind the speech.) Israelis and Americans alike have taken offense at the speech, which alienated Democrats and the President and came  from a right-wing leader currently under attack for legal indiscretions and a questionable foreign policy strategy. The NYT dissented as well.
  • Israel’s upcoming elections seem relatively meaningless.
  • Despite Netanyahu’s questionable antics, the UN’s disproportionate emphasis on Israel remains, as duly noted by US Secretary of State John Kerry.
  • A Palestinian man drove his car into a group of Jews during the Jewish holiday of Purim.
  • The PLO leadership has voted to suspend security cooperation with Israel.
  • WaPo has a piece this week on the Kurdish struggle to redefine their movement as they push towards a once-impossible goal — their own state.
  • As Yemen’s Houthis face staunch odds and Sunni-dominant neighbors withdraw their support, Iran is emerging as a friendly face.
  • Iran has allowed the Washington Post’s Jason Rezaian a lawyer — just not the one of his choosing.
  • The Iraqi army has plans to re-take Mosul, and they’re starting with Tikrit as practice; the news comes amidst tensions between American and Iraqi forces regarding plans to retake conquered territory. ISIS/Daesh reportedly killed upwards of 770 Iraqi troops after it overran an airbase north of Baghdad last month; the killing is one of the worst so far reported at the hands of the militant organization.
  • The militant group have also begun bulldozing a 3,000 year-old Assyrian city.
  • A leading Syrian rebel group may abandon its Al Qaeda connections in exchange for the patronage of Qatar.
  • An unlikely American ideologue is inspiring Egypt’s next generation of radicals.
  • International Crisis Group says Libya is deteriorating.

Sub-Saharan Africa:

  • A woman was brutally beaten to death in Nigeria by a mob after suspicion arose that she might be a suicide bomber. Her family claims that is not the case and that she was in fact mentally ill.
  • Boko Haram have killed scores of people in the country following a military offensive.
  • Liberia released its last Ebola patient after a week with no new cases. In neighboring Guinea and Sierra Leone, the disease continues to rage.

Americas:

Oceania:

  • Two Australian smugglers have been moved to an “execution island” location to be, well, executed.

Weekly Wow: Fewer women run big companies in the US than men named John. | The 30 most influential people on the internet.

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